Medical Savings Accounts (msas)

Definition of "Medical savings accounts (msas)"

Ann Vaughn & Wendy Vaughn real estate agent

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Ann Vaughn & Wendy Vaughnelite badge icon

CENTURY 21 Birchwood Realty, Inc.

Savings accounts that have tax advantages combined with health insurance plans for the benefit of the employee. Both the employee and the employer are permitted to contribute to the MSA. The contributions can be directed to pay the deductible under the health insurance plan and/or the medical expenses not covered by the health insurance plan. Funds not spent are allowed to accumulate in the MSA on a continuous basis. When the employee reaches retirement age, the accumulated funds may be allocated to the employee's retirement income. The MSA differs from a flexible spending account (FSA) in one very important respect: Under an MSA, funds not used for current health care expenses belong to the employee. Under an FSA, funds not under the current health care expenses belong to the employer.

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