Definition of "Is Fort Lauderdale safe?"

Barbara Zaccagnini real estate agent

Written by

Barbara Zaccagninielite badge icon

Coldwell Banker Realty

Great things can be said about Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Everyone knows about its world-class amenities, with top-rated restaurants and 23 miles of beaches, which for many, seems like the best place to live. Not to mention the fact that the city is known as the “Venice of America” because of its extensive Intracoastal waterways, which is perfect for boating. But, many people who decide to relocate here are also concerned about their safety. So, is Fort Lauderdale, FL, a safe place to live? Let’s find out!

The Miami metropolitan area is one of the most visited places in Florida, and for a good reason. Everyone heard about Miami, for it’s excellent coastal vibes. However, the metro area is home to the beautiful Fort Lauderdale FL and many consider it a tropical paradise with great year-round weather, stunning ocean views and great amenities which make it one of Florida’s top coastal destinations.

But, safety is just as crucial if you are looking for a place that offers an excellent quality of life. So, how safe is the city of Fort Lauderdale, FL? By looking at the statistics, we can notice that violent crime rates and property crime rates are relatively high. Compared with Miami, it seems that Fort Lauderdale, FL is the least safe, but both cities have their fair share of problems. Despite that, neither rank as the most dangerous place in South Florida.

It might be expensive to live in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, but it can also be unsafe in some regards. The reported number of violent crime rates is about 5.6 incidents per 1,000 residents, above the state average of 3.8 incidents per 1,000 residents. On the other hand, the big issue with the town of Fort Lauderdale lies in the property crime rates, which are close to 50 incidents per 1,000 residents, higher than Florida’s average of 23 incidents per 1,000 residents.

Theft, burglary, and vehicle theft are the main issues faced by the city, but some neighborhoods are safer than others. Statistics show that communities close to the Oceanfront and family-friendly neighborhoods tend to be way safer, and this applies to popular touristic attractions as well. As always, exercise caution and keep your valuables out of sight.

If you want to find out more about the safest neighborhoods in the area, don’t hesitate to contact our top real estate agents in Fort Lauderdale FL, who can assist you in relocating to one of the city’s best neighborhoods.

image of a real estate dictionary page

Have a question or comment?

We're here to help.

*** Your email address will remain confidential.
 

 

Popular Real Estate Questions

Popular Real Estate Glossary Terms

Same as term yield: The income earned on an investment, typically stated as a percentage of the market price ...

Continuous beam on top of supporting walls, usually constructed of concrete and often having steel rods for additional strength placed within it. Supplies lateral support as well as ...

Expenditure paid to occupy property over a specified time period. ...

Financial institution that services savings and checking accounts, provides loans, and deals with negotiable instruments. Stringent federal and local regulations exist over banking ...

The method for splitting a commission between a registered real estate sales person and the sponsoring real estate broker, and between the listing broker and the selling broker, or any ...

Agreement between a lending institution and borrower where the borrower agrees to extend or spread the collateral of a loan to additional properties beyond the original mortgaged property. ...

Aerial navigation that may interfere with a property owner, such as creating undue noise. The value of land near an airport may decline in value for this reason. Further airport congestion ...

You can often bump into the question of what is lot and block in real estate before selling or purchasing a piece of land. This entry will shed light on the lot and block ...

a rental in which the lessor pays all operating costs such as taxes, utilities, insurance, and maintenance. It is usually a short-term lease and a common arrangement. Typically there is no ...