Definition of "Force majeure"

Michelle Baker real estate agent

Written by

Michelle Bakerelite badge icon

Real Broker LLC

An unpreventable, overwhelming, and irresistible force. It is common to place a force majeure clause in a construction contract to indemnify a construction deadline in the event an act of God should occur which prevents a timely completion of the contract. For example, a contractor places a force majeure clause in a contract for the construction of a building which is to be completed within nine months. Due to an unexpectedly cold winter, the project had to be delayed three months.

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