Definition of "Alluvium"

Angelica Vazquez real estate agent

Written by

Angelica Vazquezelite badge icon

Ez Choice Realty

Did you hear a real estate contractor mentioning the territory you want to build a dwelling on is made of alluvium? Or a home inspector told you a section is in danger because there’s a lot of alluvium around it?

And you have no idea what alluvium is?

Alluvium is loose, unconsolidated detrital material, soil and sediments that’s been eroded and reshaped by water. You’ll typically find alluvium made by a mix of sand, gravel, silt, clay and other organic matter – never cemented together into a solid rock – deposited in a non-marine setting.

The term “alluvium” is not typically used for situations where the sediment was formed by another perennial geological process. For instance: a soil reshaped by the erosion of a river stream is not considered alluvial; it’s not called alluvium. The only time we call it alluvium is when the soil was formed via an inconsistent geological process like rain and flooding (which can occur from time to time and, with the reiteration of it, makes its mark on the soil), and heavy tidal action like tsunamis, that can occur only once, but are so strong that bring a lot of detrital material and mix it to the soil, reshaping it. Throughout the coast of the United States, with all sea level and flood risks caused by global warming, there are tons of cases where homeowners need to deal with alluvial occurrences.

Real Estate Tips:

Let a Real Estate Agent reshape your odds in Real Estate! Find the best local real estate agents in The OFFICIAL Real Estate Agent Directory®.

image of a real estate dictionary page

Have a question or comment?

We're here to help.

*** Your email address will remain confidential.
 

 

Popular Real Estate Terms

A binding arbitration is a way to solve disputes without going to court. An alternative to the more expensive and lengthy legal procedures, a binding arbitration is basically the process ...

Court order granted in favor of the landlord to remove a tenant from the property because of nonpayment of rent and/or damaging the property. The writ directs an officer of the law to ...

A method widely used for evaluating real estate projects. Under the net present value method, the present value (PV) of all cash inflows from the project is compared against the initial ...

A legally transferable debt instrument by which the issuer agrees to pay the payee within a certain time period. Note usually pay a specified rate of interest tied to the market rate of ...

If you are a real estate investor and you come across this term, you might wind up wondering … What is the operating expense ratio? The operating expense ratio (OER) is a way for ...

An idiomatic expression indicating the desire of an individual to understand new surroundings and all of its nuances including its quality and character. The derivation of the expression ...

Large, high-volume food store where customers serve themselves by going through the aisles and selecting their groceries to be paid at the cash register on the way out. ...

Funds that are retained in an account until a certain event occurs. For example, a downpayment on a contract held until full payment is received whereupon the holding funds are credited to ...

Legal right or privilege, such as that arising from a contract, to use land owned by another person or business for a specific purpose. The use should be reasonable for the circumstances. ...

Popular Real Estate Questions